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Peyton Manning, Morgan Wallen hug after Tennessee hits home run to start deciding College World Series game

Tennessee Volunteers baseball fans had much to cheer about in the first inning of the team’s do-or-die Game 3 of the Men’s College World Series on Monday night.

Christian Moore led off the game against Texas A&M with a solo home run to give the Vols an early lead. The crowd at Charles Schwab Field Omaha went berserk.

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The ESPN broadcast then panned to a box that showed Peyton Manning hugging country star Morgan Wallen, who was wearing a pinstripe Tennessee baseball jersey. Rick Barnes, the Volunteers’ men’s basketball coach, and Josh Heupel, the football coach, were also celebrating.

Tennessee lost the first game of the Men’s College World Series to Texas A&M, 9-5. 

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The Aggies tried to put the Volunteers away in Game 2 and had a 1-0 lead for most of the game, but Tennessee scored four runs combined in the seventh and eighth innings to help force a deciding Game 3. Dylan Dreiling and Cal Stark each hit home runs in that game.

Each team will bring home their first College World Series title with a win on Monday night.

Tennessee made the College World Series in 2021 and 2023 but failed to get to the final three-game series. The team was only runners-up in 1951.

Texas A&M made the College World Series in 2017 and 2022 but never made it to the final three-game series.

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National park tourist dies after being swept over waterfall: officials

A young woman from Pennsylvania died at Glacier National Park after she was swept over a waterfall, park officials say.

The 26-year-old fell into the water near St. Mary Falls at around 5:20 p.m. on Sunday, according to officials. The waterfall, which is located in Glacier County, Montana, is around 35 feet tall.

After falling, the woman was washed over the waterfall and was trapped underwater for several minutes.

Bystanders at the park quickly assisted and brought the woman out of the water before first responders arrived. Bystanders also administered CPR on the woman before park rangers and ambulance personnel took over.

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The Pennsylvania resident was declared dead at around 7 p.m. that night. Glacier National Park says that the woman's death is being investigated.

"The park extends their deepest condolences to family and friends of the woman and asks that the public respect their privacy," the park's statement added.

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Drowning and falls are top causes of death at Glacier National Park. Last year, a 28-year-old woman from Kansas died after falling into one of the park's creeks.

In 2017, a visitor taking photos fell into a creek at the park and was swept off a steep cliff. The 26-year-old man, who fell around 100 feet, was pronounced dead.

Authorities are actively investigating the incident. There is no additional information at this time.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Woman sexually assaulted while sunbathing in Central Park, suspect at large: NYPD

Police in New York City are searching for a suspect that sexually assaulted a woman who was sunbathing in Central Park on Monday afternoon.

Around 1:30 p.m., police responded to an area of Central Park for a report of an attempted rape on a female victim.

Police said a woman in her 20s was sunbathing alone in a secluded part of the park when a black man, believed to be in his 30s, approached her and began exposing himself.

Officials said she got up and tried to run away when he tackled her from behind.

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Police said she was able to fight him off and he ran away.

The woman was then taken to a local hospital for evaluation. 

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Police are looking for the suspect, who was described as a black man, in his 30s, around 6'0 tall and medium build with curly hair and wearing a light colored shirt and shorts.

YOSEMITE NATIONAL PARK EMPLOYEE TARGETED IN BRUTAL RAPE INCIDENT: OFFICIALS

Officials said a heavy police presence will remain around the park as they continue to search through surveillance footage and the perimeter for the suspect.

Anyone with information about this incident or the suspects' whereabouts is encouraged to contact the NYPD. 

Company supplying eyewear to veterans accused of ‘bait-and-switch’ to undercut competition

A company supplying eyewear to veterans has been accused of lowballing prices to win a contract with the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), then making up that money on the backs of veterans through higher prices for upgrades and aggressive sales tactics – all at the expense of quality. 

Based in Kentucky, and run by U.S. veterans, PDS Consultants won a five-year contract in November 2022 to manufacture eyewear and provide other optician services for VISN 7, replacing competitor Superior Optical the following October. 

VISNs, or "Veterans Integrated Services Networks," refer to a nationwide network of clinics and other healthcare facilities for U.S. veterans. VISN 7 covers Georgia, Alabama, and South Carolina

To win the contract for VISN 7, PDS Consultants bid less than $10 million for the contract – far lower than what Superior Optical and Carter-Lambert bid, at around $30 million and $40 million, respectively. 

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Many employees who were working for Superior Optical found themselves working for PDS Consultants overnight, after the company took over VISN 7. Fox News Digital previously reported on PDS employees who felt pressured to upsell veterans and beat monthly sales goals. 

In the months following that report, Fox News Digital received a barrage of messages from people close to PDS Consultants and the VA, who alleged that the company was making up the loss on the backs of veterans. Each person requested anonymity for fear of reprisal. 

A source close to the VA who spoke to Fox News Digital on the condition of anonymity likened the way PDS Consultants won the contract for VISN 7 to a "bait-and-switch." 

"They undercut the competition by bidding as low as $1 on lenses. Any reasonable person knows there is no way you can make an eyeglass lens for under a dollar," the source said. "Well, you got to make that money up in some way – because no business is going to stay in business unless you’re making money, obviously. So, what [PSD] would do is, on the back end, they would upsell their eyeglasses, add-ons [and] upgrades at higher prices to the veterans." 

Court filings show PDS Consultants proposed asymmetric or "unbalanced" pricing, where the company offered some products well below market rate and others well above market rate. Some line items were provided for nominal prices or even free, in the case of optician services, for $0 per hour. 

But despite the contracting officer determining that PDS’ prices were "significantly understated" for some services and "significantly overstated" for others, these unbalanced prices were not deemed an "unacceptable risk of overpayment by the taxpayer." 

Still, the source close to the VA whom Fox News Digital spoke with alleged that eyeglass quality plummeted under PDS’ stewardship, likening it to going from Ray-Bans to Walmart products. 

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"The veterans were getting very poorly crafted, poorly made, eyeglass products. Sometimes they would be delivered broken. [Sometimes] they would be delivered with the wrong prescriptions," the source said, adding that delivery times went "through the roof." 

"We were getting complaints from veterans, I would say six, seven, eight complaints a day about the poor craftsmanship, the quality, the delivery times. Sometimes it would go for 15 days, which is double the time that they were supposed to send it," the source said. 

Other sources told Fox News Digital that veterans' options for free frames and lenses were drastically reduced after PDS Consultants took over VISN 7. One source said the company offered the "worst of the worst" brands for free and charged much higher for upgrades than previous incumbents, which meant veterans were paying more out of pocket.  

Fox News Digital reached out to the VA in February to inquire about the allegations against PDS Consultants. VA Press Secretary Terrence Hayes told Fox News Digital at the time that the department "has not received any direct Veteran complaints about the vendor, nor has VA been made aware that any Veterans have been asked to pay higher prices when they fill their prescriptions."  

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But the source close to the VA contradicted that statement, saying that the VA received more complaints after PDS Consultants won the VISN 7 contract, "than all 10 years of the prior incumbent contractors combined." 

Fox News Digital reached out to the VA again this month to inquire about these allegations.

Secretary Hayes told Fox News Digital its VISN 7 clinical team "is aware of Veteran complaints and have made efforts to address those concerns," without elaborating.  

"If contractors fail to meet the high standards our Veteran patients deserve, we hold them accountable to the terms of their contracts and when necessary, take steps to terminate the contract," Hayes said. "If there is documented past performance by a contractor, then the government may choose to resolicit for a new contract vendor." 

Hayes said the Veterans Health Administration awards "firm, fixed-price contracts," meaning the price "is not subject to any adjustment based on the contractor's cost experience." 

In other words, the contractor bears the maximum risk and full responsibility for all costs and resulting profit or loss. 

Hayes denied the notion that veterans pay higher out-of-pocket costs "because prescription eyeglasses are provided to veterans at no cost." He acknowledged that veterans may have noticed fewer choices to choose from with a switch in vendor, but denied that the quality had diminished.

"Should a Veteran want a specific brand, or specialty lens that is not medically indicated, the Veteran has the option to pay an upcharge for that selection," Hayes said. "Lastly, when there is an error in manufacturing or if eyeglasses arrive broken, VA pays for the remakes. Veterans are not charged for replacement eyeglasses in those cases."

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PDS Vice President Rob Yopps told Fox News Digital the company stands by its performance and its Veteran owners "are proud of their service to our Nation in combat and honored to continue to serve our Nation's Veterans." 

Yopps declined to comment on PDS' specific bidding strategy, saying the company follows "the established process governed by the VA." 

He said that the awarding of the VISN 7 contract has yielded "substantial savings for the U.S. taxpayer." 

"PDS complies with its contracts as agreed to with the VA. PDS’ performance is addressed through VA's official channels. PDS received positive past performance reviews from VA indicating satisfaction with our performance on the referenced contract," Yopps said.

He referenced the VA's previous comments to Fox News Digital, when it stated it "found no evidence of price increases after PDS won the contract, nor has it received any direct Veteran complaints about the vendor."

In the meantime, Superior Optical has filed a lawsuit in the Court of Federal Claims against the VA, protesting the awarding of the five-year contract to PDS Consultants. Oral arguments for that case are expected to begin in late July.  

MSNBC host shrugs off illegal immigrant killing young girl: 'That's one out of 11 million'

An MSNBC host was dismissive on Saturday after a conservative guest brought up the murder of a young girl by an illegal immigrant, appearing to suggest it was an isolated incident meant to smear immigrants more broadly.

Heritage Foundation President Kevin Roberts had a tense debate about deporting illegal immigrants with multiple MSNBC personalities. "So what do these people do, what are they doing now?" MSNBC host and former RNC Chair Michael Steele asked. "The folks, the 11 million, 20 million, whatever you want to deport?"

"A lot of them are committing crimes like murdering the 12-year-old girl in Houston," Roberts said, appearing to reference the murder of 12-year-old Jocelyn Nungaray that has become a national news story. 

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"So that’s one, that’s one, out of 11 million," Steele said.

"We could take the remaining time of this segment and I could give you a lot of examples-" Roberts said.

MSNBC host Symone Sanders-Townsend interjected by citing a statistic arguing that "undocumented immigrants" were less likely to be convicted of a crime.

"Tell that to the survivors of these people," Roberts said, later asking "What do you tell the parents of those people, those young girls that were killed?

Steele then asked what the difference is between an "illegal" immigrant committing such a crime versus "anyone else" who commits the same crime, eventually being chastised by Sanders-Townsend for using the term "illegal." He went on to ask, "What you're saying is because you have this instance of individuals behaving badly that that's a reflection of every individual in that community and that’s just not the case."

Sanders-Townsend later argued that she and MSNBC host Alicia Menendez would argue to Roberts, "You are weaponizing a horrific murder to smear 11 million people."

"That is a laughable assertion," Roberts replied. "What Joe Biden is doing is weaponizing the entire government against every American."

MSNBC didn't immediately respond to a request for comment.

Julian Assange, WikiLeaks founder, reaches plea deal to avoid prison in US

WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange has entered into a plea deal for his alleged role in a massive government data breach as part of an agreement with the Justice Department that will allow him to avoid imprisonment, according to court documents.

Assange will plead guilty to one count of conspiring to obtain and disclose information related to the national defense in a federal court in Saipan, in the Northern Mariana Islands, a U.S. terroitory, this week.

The guilty plea must be approved by a judge. Assange spent five years in a British prison fighting extradition to the United States. He previously spent seven years of refuge in the Ecuadorian Embassy in London after Swedish authorities sought his arrest on rape allegations.

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Assange, 52, will be sentenced to time served of 62 months, the equivalent to the prison time he spent in the United Kingdom. 

His asylum claim was eventually withdrawn by the Ecuadorian government, after they became irritated at his alleged behavior inside the embassy, and he was arrested in 2019. 

Seth Stern, director of advocacy at Freedom of the Press Foundation, told Fox News Digital:

"It’s good news that the DOJ is putting an end to this embarrassing saga. But it’s alarming that the Biden administration felt the need to extract a guilty plea for the purported crime of obtaining and publishing government secrets. The plea deal won’t have the precedential effect of a court ruling, but it will still hang over the heads of national security reporters for years to come."

"The deal doesn’t add any more prison time or punishment for Assange. It’s purely symbolic," Stern added. "The administration could’ve easily just dropped the case but chose to instead legitimize the criminalization of routine journalistic conduct and encourage future administrations to follow suit."

The charges against Assange stem from one of the largest publications of classified information in American history. Assange, an Australian citizen and hero to many free press advocates, disclosed tens of thousands of documents related to reports about the U.S. wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, as well as State Department cables and information about the detention of prisoners at Guantanamo Bay.

The plea agreement comes months after President Biden said he was considering a request from Australia to drop the U.S. push to prosecute Assange. The White House was not involved in the decision to resolve Assange's case, according to a White House official who not authorized to speak publicly and spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity.

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Federal prosecutors said Assange conspired with Chelsea Manning, then a U.S. Army intelligence analyst, to steal diplomatic cables and military files published in 2010 by WikiLeaks. Prosecutors had accused Assange of damaging national security by publishing documents that harmed the U.S. and its allies and aided its adversaries.

Manning was sentenced to 35 years in prison. President Barack Obama commuted the sentence in 2017 in the final days of his presidency.

Clayton Weimers, executive director of Reporters Without Borders (RSF) USA, said his group has been fighting to secure Assange's release.  

"In fact, our team, and in particular Director of Campaigns Rebecca Vincent, were the only NGO representatives present in the London courtroom for every single one of Assange's hearings and the only NGO to visit him in prison," Weimers told Fox News Digital. "His release represents a vindication of that yearslong fight. This is a victory for press freedom, but until the Espionage Act is reformed to include a public interest defense, this ordeal could happen to any publisher of leaked classified material, including journalists and media outlets."

Swedish prosecutors dropped their investigation into Assange in 2017 and an international arrest warrant against him was withdrawn. However, he was still wanted by British authorities for skipping bail when he entered the embassy. 

Assange made headlines again in 2016 after his website published Democratic emails that prosecutors say were stolen by Russian intelligence operatives. He was never charged in special counsel Robert Mueller’s Russia investigation.

The Associated Press contributed to this report. 

JJ Redick has clear response to critics' concerns about coaching Lakers: 'I really don’t give a f---'

JJ Redick was officially introduced as the next Los Angeles Lakers head coach on Monday afternoon, and he knew he was going to face a question regarding his lack of experience. 

He was prepared for it. 

"I have never coached in the NBA before. I don’t know if you guys have heard that," Redick said with a sarcastic smirk. 

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But one reporter followed up that statement from Redick by asking if he heard the critics and naysayers, and whether he's looking to dispel any "misconceptions" about being the team's next head coach. 

"It’s a valid question and I certainly heard everything," Redick responded. "It’s been a really interesting six weeks or so just in terms of being part of the engagement-farming industry. It’s been really interesting. 

"However, I don’t really have a great answer for your questions because I really don’t give a f---. Like honestly, I want to coach the Lakers. I want to coach the team. I don’t want to dispel anything. I don’t. I want to become a great coach in the NBA, and I want to win championships. And I want my players to maximize their careers. That’s all I f---ing care about."

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Redick went on to explain his motivation for joining the Lakers as their new head coach despite not being a coach before in his career. The former sharpshooter went into sports media after his playing career came to an end. 

"My motivation for doing this, it starts with a very simple foundation of service," he explained. "I think about the greatest moments, especially towards the end of my career, was about helping players. It starts with the desire to serve players, to serve the Lakers organization, to serve our fans. It’s also about competition and performance, collaboration, leadership. These are the things that drive me."

Redick also noted that he won't be podcasting anymore, especially with his "Mind the Game" pod he did with Lakers star LeBron James

Speaking of James, Redick's connection to the all-time leading scorer in NBA history was immediately pegged as a reason he landed in Los Angeles. 

However, Redick explained that he only spoke to James, who is expected to opt out of his Lakers contract and enter free agency, after he got the job offer from GM Rob Pelinka. 

"LeBron and I did not talk about the Lakers’ job until Thursday afternoon about 30 minutes after I was offered the job, and that was very intentional on both our parts," Redick said. "I had an understanding that he did not want to be involved in this, and for me, I did not want to go down the part of hypotheticals with someone that I consider a friend and someone I have a great amount of respect for."

Redick's first coaching job comes with a franchise known for its history of dominance in the league, and he understands those expectations. 

"Sitting in this seat, I know what the expectations are," he said. "Lakers fans have some of the most passionate fans around the world and the expectation is a championship. It’s my job, it’s our staff’s job, it’s Rob’s job, it’s all of us to deliver a championship-caliber team. That’s what I signed up for."

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Ask a doctor: ‘Is it ever OK to take someone else’s prescription medication?’

Most of us have, at some time or another, asked a friend or family member for some over-the-counter medicine to treat a headache or an upset stomach, as the dosage and directions are fairly universal. 

But is the same protocol appropriate when it comes to taking someone else’s prescription medication?

The resounding answer from medical doctors is an emphatic "no." 

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There are specific reasons why. 

"Taking someone else’s prescribed medication can be very harmful," LaTasha Perkins, M.D., a family physician at Medstar Georgetown University Hospital in Washington, D.C., told Fox News Digital.

"You need to take only your own medicine and not someone else’s, because so much goes into figuring it out."

Numerous considerations are involved in prescribing medication to a patient, Perkins said — including health status, medical history and blood work — which can be completely different from one person to the next. 

Even if you take the same medication as someone else, the other person may be on a different dose of it, the doctor noted.

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"A lot of medications also look and sound the same, so you have to take what was specifically prescribed to you," she cautioned.

Drug interactions present another concern. 

"If you’re taking vitamins or any other medication that may interact with a prescription medicine, that should be taken into account when tailoring your prescription," Perkins said.

Allergies are yet another key consideration, the doctor warned, as some people are allergic to the additives in medications.

"There’s a reason the medication is prescribed — because it’s personalized to each individual based on a variety of health factors," Perkins said.

Chad Weston, M.D., a physician with Novant Health Oceanside Family Medicine & Convenient Care – Brunswick in Shallotte, North Carolina, agreed that taking a medication prescribed to a different individual, even for seemingly similar symptoms, can be harmful and have unintended consequences. 

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"These consequences range from severe allergic reactions to medication interactions and overdosing, causing damage to organs such as the liver and kidneys," he said in an interview with Fox News Digital.

Instead of seeking symptom relief by taking someone else’s medication, you should see a doctor to get an accurate medical diagnosis and prescription, Weston advised.

In the event that you’re traveling and don’t have your medicine with you, Perkins said the best thing to do is call your doctor. 

"If you don’t have your medicine, we can call it into a pharmacy wherever you are," she said.

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"This is why it’s so important to have a family physician," she said. 

"Having a relationship with your doctor can help you navigate situations like this."

Carnival guests left dangling in midair after park ride malfunctions

18 guests at a carnival in Southern California were trapped midair after a Zipper ride malfunctioned over the weekend.

The incident took place at the Conejo Valley Days carnival in Thousand Oaks. The Ventura County Fire Department (VCFD) made a Facebook post about the situation on Monday, and reported that they were alerted to the incident at around 8:05 p.m. on Sunday night. 

"Sunday night, VCFD firefighters responded to a technical rescue at the Conejo Creek Park as approximately 18 people were trapped on an amusement park ride," the Facebook post explained.

"Firefighters were able to successfully rescue all riders, by manually lowering the amusement ride," the post added.

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Authorities noted that the rescue took around a half hour. No injuries were reported, and first responders were at the scene for 35 minutes.

Kastl Amusements, the carnival operators, confirmed the incident to Fox News Digital. Kastl Amusements owner Kay Kastl said that the ride's pause began at around 7:45 p.m.

"The computer control system on the Zipper ride detected an anomaly and stopped the ride's operation as it was designed to do," Kastl said. "The passengers remained safely secured, were not upside down, and were in no danger at any time."

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"The ride operators began to unload the ride's 12 vehicles in accordance with the manufacturer's recommended procedure," she added. "The evacuation procedure, while seemingly slow, is carefully designed to maintain the balance of the ride vehicles and keeps the passengers safe at all times."

Kastl Amusements also reported that authorities were "on-hand but did not assist," disputing the VCFD's Facebook post. Kastl told Fox News Digital that staff assisted guests off the ride.

"All passengers were unloaded safely by ride staff with no reported injuries," she added.

Kastl Amusements is investigating the Zipper ride to determine the cause of the incident. No additional details are known at this time.

Rep. Ritchie Torres calls out NY Times 'bias' for not interviewing him for story about his anti-Israel critics

Rep. Ritchie Torres, D-N.Y., accused The New York Times of "bias" for a report largely focused on his pro-Israel stance but failed to interview him for the story.

On Saturday, the Times published a story titled "The Gaza War Is Dividing the L.G.B.T.Q. Community" which put a spotlight on the apparent tensions that have bubbled up in the gay community of Fire Island Pines.

Torres, who the Times noted is the first openly gay Afro-Latino member of Congress, was featured on a flag in Trailblazers Park alongside other historic LGBTQ figures for Pride Month. But the flag honoring Torres was quickly torn down by the gay activist group ACT-UP and was replaced with other flags, one of them honoring "queer Palestinians," according to the Times.

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 "The author of The NY Times piece — who never bothered to interview me— had a sensational narrative in mind (a divided LGBTQ community!) and found a few quotes from a few fringe figures to confirm the story he wishes to tell," Torres reacted to the report on X.

The report did cite Torres' initial response to his flag being taken down, writing earlier this month, "Did it ever occur to them that Hamas is a barbaric oppressor of Queer Palestinians? That a Queer Palestinian is far freer and safer in Israel than in a Gaza Strip ruled by Hamas."

 "Did the author ever wonder to himself: Is the LGBTQ community truly divided? Or are we mistaking a visible vocal minority for a majority?" Torres continued, slamming the report. 

The Times quoted a pro-Palestinian activist who told the paper, "I think queer people are mostly on one side of the debate," adding,"It feels like queer people are coming out for Palestine in a really large way."

"Indeed, members of the L.G.B.T.Q. community overwhelmingly self-identify as politically liberal or moderate, according to polls. A majority of Democrats have disapproved of Israel’s actions since at least last November, one month after the war began, according to Gallup surveys," the Times then wrote, appearing to agree with the pro-Palestian activist. 

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While the paper didn't interview Torres, the Times did, however, speak with ACT-UP activist Jason Rosenberg, who slammed Torres, saying, "We thought Ritchie was a poor choice to be honored, especially this year, because he has been supporting Israel’s policies."

Torres, in turn, blasted the Times reporter for giving such a platform to Rosenberg, who he accused of "celebrating" the Oct. 7 terrorist attack by Hamas, sharing a screenshot of Rosenberg sharing another X user's post reading "rooting for everyone resisting oppression."

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"Although he interviews Jason Rosenberg, who has been caught celebrating October 7th, the author couldn’t be bothered to interview the sitting Congressman who is the very subject of the article. Bias," Torres wrote.

"Jason Rosenberg celebrated October 7th on October 7th! Yet a NY Times reporter considered him more worthy of an interview than a sitting Congressman who condemns October 7th," the lawmaker followed with the screenshot from Rosenberg's X account. 

The New York Times did not immediately respond to Fox News Digital's request for comment.

Torres has stood out among Democrats on Capitol Hill for his outspoken support of Israel and has repeatedly attacked the media's anti-Israel bias.

Earlier this month, Torres knocked New York Magazine for what he called an "anti-Israel hit piece" against him that mistakenly used a photo of Democratic New York Lt. Gov. Antonio Delgado instead of him.

"If New York Magazine is going to publish an Anti-Israel hit piece by Sarah Jones, then at least do enough due diligence to get the photo right. I am not Antonio Delgado," Torres scolded the magazine.

"Not all Black people look the same," he added.

New York Magazine later corrected the image and issued an editor's note acknowledging the mistake.